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Make Mesa your home town

Mesa offers plenty of housing options for students attending five new universities
By Debra Gelbart

Make Mesa Your Home TownThe choices for college students in Mesa have increased immensely — not just from among multiple higher education institutions but with housing as well. Mesa has plenty of high-quality residence options situated just steps from walkable, bustling, growing downtown.

Options for in-state and out-of-state students include luxury housing that may interest faculty and graduate students and studio apartments for the more cost-conscious students. A number of single-family homes available for rent or to buy also are located in the downtown area. For those who don’t mind living a bit farther away, several beautifully maintained single-family homes, townhomes and condos are available within five miles of downtown.

“These quality housing options can be accessed for a price that simply can’t be found in other markets, especially the west coast,” said Jaye O’Donnell, deputy director of the Office of Economic Development in the City of Mesa.

“For those who choose to live downtown, they can enjoy a true urban lifestyle,” she said, “and they can look forward to the light rail coming to downtown in a few years.” Last year, Mesa’s downtown won an award from the magazine “This Old House.” Here is what the editors said about Mesa: “Downtown Mesa … attracts young professionals, empty nesters and families with its easy access to the city. They also cherish the neighborhood’s historic architecture…”

It’s not just residents who love the historic ambiance and livability of downtown. Business owners like Betty Freeman do, too. She and daughter Carrie Hensley co-own Inside the Bungalow, a yoga studio and café located at 48 N. Robson, just south of 1st Street. “So many areas are walkable here,” Freeman said, “and with the light rail coming through, businesses will become even more accessible to students and residents.”

Freeman is delighted by the prospect of new universities coming to town. “The city of Mesa has done a wonderful job recruiting top-notch educational institutions,” she said. “The schools are a great fit for downtown and this is a such a great opportunity for our business,” she said.

 

American History Part Three

We begin the third installment with the remainder of the war years and the beginnings of the modern Hispanic/Latino Civil Rights movement. government makes an agreement with the Mexican government to supply temporary workers, known as braceros, for American agricultural work.

In that same year, the so called “Zoot Suit” riots take place in southern California. Some elements of the California press had been portraying Mexican Americans as unwelcome foreigners. Bands of hundreds of sailors, marines, and soldiers in southern California range the Hispanic neighborhoods, looking for Mexican American young men in zoot suits. When they find them, the soldiers beat them and tears their suits off of them.

In 1944 Fulgencio Batista retires as president of Cuba. labor demands of World War II and encourage industrialization on the island, stimulated a major wave of migration of workers to the United States.

A couple of years later marked a rather profound event in Puerto Rico, when in 1946 President Harry Truman appointed Jesus T. Pinero as the first Puerto Rican governor of Puerto Rico.

Throughout the early 1950s, segregation is abolished in Texas, Arizona, and other regions, largely through the efforts of the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) and the Alianza Hispano Americana.

Immigration from Mexico doubled from 5.9 percent to 11.9 percent and in the 1960s rises to 13.3 percent of the total number of immigrants to the United States.

Although in the 50’s and 60’s Black workers continued to be the most numerous migrants along the eastern seaboard states, Mexican and Mexican American workers soon dominated the migrant paths between Texas and the Great Lakes, the Rocky Mountain region, and the wholesale nfl jerseys area from California to the Pacific Northwest. and our Hispanic/Latino neighbors. In 1951 the Bracero Program was formalized as the Mexican Farm Labor Supply Program and the Mexican Labor Agreement, and will bring an annual average of 350,000 Mexican workers to the United States until its end in 1964. taking Cuba cheap nfl jerseys from china to new lows of repression and corruption.

In the same year as the historic Brown vs. the Board of Education, there was another landmark case. In Hernandez v. Texas, the nation’s highest court acknowledged that Hispanic Americans were not being treated as “whites.” The Supreme Court recognized Hispanics as a separate class of people suffering profound discrimination, paving the cheap nfl jerseys way for Hispanic Americans to use legal means to attack all types of discrimination throughout the United States. Supreme Court case to be argued and briefed by Mexican American attorneys.

In the early 1950s, Hispanic Americans had begun to buy time on local television stations for Spanish language programs. New York, San Antonio, Corpus Christi, and Harlingen, Texas, have extensive Hispanic programming. The first Spanish language television station in the United States is San Antonio’s KCOR TV in San Antonio (it is now KWEX TV)

The Cuban Revolution succeeded in overthrowing the repressive regime of Batista and Fidel Castro takes power. Cuban Americans immigration to the United States increased sharply after this date. Large scale Cuban immigration to the United States occurs much more quickly than that from either Puerto Rico or Mexico, with more than one million Cubans entering the country since 1959. mainland are World War II or postwar era entries. Unlike the immigrant experience of Mexicans, or Cubans before 1959, wholesale nfl jerseys from china the majority of Puerto Rican immigrants entered the United States with little or no red tape.

In the 1960’s, a third phase of labor migration to the United States began when the established patterns of movement from Mexico and Puerto Rico to the United States were modified, and migration from other countries increases. The Bracero Program ends in 1964, and, after a brief decline in immigration, workers from Mexico increasingly arrive to work under the auspices of the H 2 Program of the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952, as well as for family unification purposes, or as undocumented workers.

Young Mexican Americans throughout the United States become caught up in the struggle for civil rights and seek to create a new identity for themselves. These efforts become known as the Chicano Movement. The movement sparks a renaissance in the arts among Mexican Americans. Many Chicano artists call attention to inequalities faced by Mexican Americans, developing new styles of art that eventually gain acceptance in mainstream literary and art scenes.

During this same decade, 1961 to be exact, anti Communist Cuban exiles who were trained and armed by the United States, attempt a incursion into Cuba that is doomed from the beginning. The failure of the infamous Bay of Pigs invasion embitters thousands of exiled Cubans, while strengthening Castro’s position at home. Many observers throughout the world criticize President John F. Kennedy’s administration for this attempt.

The United Farm Workers Organizing Committee in California (around 1962), began as an independent organization, was led by Cesar Chavez. In 1965 it organizes its successful Delano grape strike and first national boycott. It becomes part of the AFL CIO in 1966. Today the union is known as the United Farmworkers of America. The following year, the end of the bracero program forces many Mexicans to return to Mexico. border. governments began border industrialization programs, allowing foreign corporations to build and operate assembly plants on the border. These plants, known as maquiladoras, multiplied rapidly, transforming the border region. The maquiladors attract companies because they provide cheap labor close to American markets. They employed hundreds of thousands of Mexicans in assembly work, but often in poor working conditions.

For the first time, the United States enacted a law placing a cap on immigration from the Western Hemisphere, becoming effective in 1968.

Also in 1965, Fidel Castro announced that Cubans can leave the island nation if they have relatives in the United States. He stipulates, however, that Cubans already in Florida have to come and get their relatives. Nautical crafts of all types systematically leave Miami, returning laden with anxious Cubans eager to rejoin their families on the mainland.

A major revision of immigration law results when Congress amended the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952. The national origin quota system was abolished.

As we enter the 1970’s, 82 percent of the Hispanic population of the nation lives in nine states (that number rose to 86 percent in 1990). The largest Hispanic populations are in California, Texas, and New York, and to a lesser degree Florida, Illinois, and New Jersey.

A Chicano Moratorium is announced in a protest against the Vietnam War organized in Los Angeles. More than 20,000 Chicanos and supporters draw attention to the disproportionately high number of Chicano casualties in that war. Conflicts erupt between police and demonstrators. Journalist Ruben Salazar, not involved in the struggle, is accidentally killed by police.

An employment discrimination case, Espinoza v. Farah Manufacturing Company, argues discrimination toward an employee, Espinoza, on the basis of his citizenship status under the Civil Rights Act. However, the Supreme Court holds that there is nothing in Title VII, the equal employment opportunities provisions of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 that makes it illegal to discriminate on the basis of citizenship or alienage.

Congress passes the Equal Educational Opportunity Act, in 1974, to create equality in public schools by making bilingual education available to Hispanic youth. According to the framers of the act, equal education means more than equal facilities and equal access to teachers. Students who have trouble with the English language must be given programs to help them learn English.

The 80’s saw Japanese industrialists take advantage of the maquiladoras by sending greater amounts of raw materials to Mexico where they are finished and shipped duty free to the United States.Articles Connexes: